Camino Surf Valdovino

Spain: Galicia East

Families, kids, old and young, group and solo traveller are welcome at this surf camp with various accommodation options, combo packages and off season deals.

LowPressure's Stormrider Surf Guide says 

Galicia’s landscape of steep forested hills hidden behind clouds of misty drizzle earned it the “end of the world” nickname from the Romans. Since then, the Celtic inhabitants or Gallegos, have been left alone in this un-Spanish corner of Iberia. Plunging valleys cut across the landscape, leading to large inlets and estuaries called “rias”. Similar to fjords, these flooded valleys deeply punctuate the coastline, and effectively filter the consistent North Atlantic swells. Galicia has mainland Europe’s largest swell window and the jagged coastline means somewhere will always be offshore.


Galicia differs from its neighbours to the east in several ways. Although the coastal rock formations are not particularly good for surfing reefs, there are literally hundreds of beaches facing every different direction. Some of these can produce excellent waves, given the right conditions. Galicia has a wide swell window and one of the highest wave climates in Europe. Unlike Asturias, Cantabria and the Basque Country, swells from the W or even SW get in here no problem. However, despite the abundance of swell, most breaks only handle up to medium-sized waves. On the big days one looks for spots that face away from the main swell direction. There is so much open space in Galicia that crowds are not really a factor, even in summer. The only exceptions might be some of the beaches close to the cities of Ferrol and Coruña - Pantín or Doniños, for example. One factor that keeps down the number of visiting surfers is the temperature of the water. Strong upwelling and the proximity of the southward-flowing Canary Current keeps the water temperature cold throughout the year, particularly on the beaches around Cabo Fisterra and the Costa da Morte, necessitating a 4/3 steamer and boots, even in mid-August. This, combined with its high swell exposure, means that Galicia offers an excellent summer alternative to the much more crowded areas such as southwest France.

 Find more general info about when to go and statistics on the Low Pressure’s Stormrider Guide’s website.


Condition descriptions provided by the Operator

Galicia, located in the uttermost northwest of Spain, was considered the end of the world - Finisterrae - until the discovery of the Americas. Up to now, this remote part of the Iberian peninsula is widely untroubled by the effects of mass-tourism and therefore still considered an insider tip. Rolling sand-dunes and endless white sandy beaches string together with ragged cliffs and lagoons of all sizes. The mountainous natural preserves harbour wild horses, grazing within the ruins of ancient celtic settlements. 

Valdoviño, a real gem on the Galician coast, hosts the Camino Surf Camp. The beautiful, four kilometer wide, sandy beach Playa de Frouxeira - right on the doorstep - with its perfect surfing-peaks, a lagune, picturesque hinterland as well as plenty of different surf-spots in range guarantee for a memorable nature- and surfing-experience. The charming seaport city of Ferrol, just 20 km from the Camino Base Camp, attracts visitors with a variety of spanish/galician culture: from the historic city center with its cafes and tapas bars to the majestic fortresses of San Felipe and La Palma. Besides, discos, clubs and pubs are also on offer: Party on!

Playa de Frouxeira: 
[geogr. Daten: 43.618505, -8.165989]

 

Characteristics: Camino Surf's Home-Break: Playa de Frouxeira's four kilometers of beautiful sandy beach, also known as the "Ho'okipa of Europe", is a well exposed beach-break where you'll always find a wave for yourself.

Wave: Beach-Break (sandy bottom)
Swell-direction: N, NW, W, SW
Wind-direction: SE
Tide: all Tides
Crowds: empty/moderate

Playa de Pantin: 
[geogr. Daten: 43.641023, -8.114913]

Characteristics: One of the best-known surfpots in northern spain and venue of the annual "Pantin Classic" WQS-5-Star Surfcontest. A very consistent break with perfectly pealing waves - can get crowded, especially on weekends

Wave: Beach-Break (sandy bottom)
Swell-direction: N, NW, W
Wind-direction: S
Tide: all Tides
Crowds: moderate/crowded

Playa de Rio Meiras: 
[geogr. Daten: 43.603246, -8.193362]

Characteristics: Right next to Playa de Frouxeira, this picturesque, sandy beach is embedded within rugged cliffs and is considered a retreat especially on days with big swell. On such days, it can get quite crowded. 

Wave: Beach-Break (sandy bottom)
Swell-direction: NW, W, SW
Wind-direction: SO, S
Tide: all tides
Crowds: empty/moderate



Playa de St. Xorxe: 
[geogr. Daten: 43.533096, -8.303955]

Characteristics: The large bay of St. Xorxe (or San Xurxo) hosts a number of interesting surfing opportunities which develop their true potential especially on days with southerly winds. Typically, this beach does not get as sizeable and crowded as the more prominent and close-by Playa de Doniños. Therefor, St. Xorxe always constitutes a welcome alternative in the Ferrol-Area. 

Wave: Beach-Break (sandy bottom)
Swell-direction: NW, W, SW
Wind-direction: SW, S, SE, E
Tide: all tides
Crowds: empty/moderate

Doniños: 
[geogr. Daten: 43.4966,-8.325934]

Characteristics: A very well-known surfing-gem on the Galician coast. The northerly part of the beach hosts some powerful lefts and rights. Due to its proximity to the close-by town of Ferrol and A Coruña, it can get pretty crowded - particularly on weekends.

Wave: Beach-Break (sandy bottom)
Swell-direction: NW, W, SW
Wind-direction: SW, S, SE, E
Tide: all tides
Crowds: moderate/crowded