Star Pine Lodge

Portugal: Lisbon

Stay in this cozy villa near the Westernmost point of Europe - where the land meets the sea, and get back to nature with surf, yoga and mountain-bike packages.

LowPressure Stormrider Surf Guide says

Much like Ireland, Portugal receives most North Atlantic swells and while its lower latitude makes it a far warmer destination, the water remains cold year-round. Most of the coast is wide open to the consistent W-NW swells, except for 20km of SE facing coastline from Caiscais to Oeiras, producing perfect conditions when a big swell pounds the coast. Although there are several good set-ups along this stretch, peaks are competitive 24/7, year round. Driving alongside this beach boulevard (or taking the Linha de Estoril train) in classic winter conditions will give idyllic views of Carcavelos or the peeling rights of Bica or Bolina. Being so close to the city of Lisbon brings some pollution issues as the flow from the mouth of the Rio Tejo and Lisbon’s huge, busy harbour, swings right past these breaks. It’s not enough to deter the crowds, which have been swelling since the first Portugese pioneers took to the water on Hawaiian koa imports in the 1950’s.

Travelling surfers tend to skip the Lisbon surf zone when faced with the big city hassles of crowded waves, polluted waters, expensive living and traffic nightmares but don’t realise what they are missing out on. Lisbon is one of those rare gems– a cultural mishmash of art, history, peoples and lifestyles that just happens to sit smack in the middle of a classic wave zone. It really doesn’t matter whether it’s two foot or twenty, somewhere in the Lisbon area will have a wave worth riding. The west coast and the Costa Caparica offers consistent beach breaks and, if you know where to look, even a bit of peace and quiet. The Estoril coast offers shelter from booming NW swells and winds, on some reefs, points and beaches that can get epic. Lisbon is a superb year round surf zone, the winters stay delightfully mild and the summers never get too hot. Wave wise it sucks up swells from the south right around to the northwest.

Find more general info about when to go and statistics on the Low Pressure’s Stormrider Guide’s website.