Sama Sama

Indonesia

Unique surf trip, search for and surf perfect uncrowded waves anywhere in surf rich Indonesia on this super stylish and cosy surf charter yacht

LowPressure's Stormrider Surf Guide says:

Northern Maluku

The original Spice Islands, the Maluku (Moluccas or Molluques are alternative names) are part of the easternmost archipelago of Indonesia, and the only Indonesian island chain in the Pacific. The Magallenes expedition, which took a ton of spices back to Spain in 1521, first put Maluku on the map. Despite waves as good as the Philippines, these islands remain largely ignored by travelling surfers. Occasional forays into the region by boat have revealed an outstanding variety of breaks, most of which go unsurfed.

Find more general info about when to go and statistics on the Low Pressure’s Stormrider Guide website.


Savu and Rote

Savu and Rote is a region that cops stronger wind than most places in Indonesia, which often brings cross-chop to line-ups that look like they should be offshore. Like Sumba, there are more breaks to be sniffed out, but wind direction and strength will be critical, as will the direction that the swell arrives through the narrow SSW to W window. West Timor’s far southern coast is SW swell exposed at a couple of obvious reef set-ups, but it soon transforms into long sandy beaches and large rivermouths bringing sediment from the mountainous interior.
Coupled with geographical isolation from the main Indonesian surf hubs, the islands of Savu (also spelt Sawu, Sabu, Hawu, etc) and Rote have remained a bit of a frontier, with most surfers looking to escape the Bali crowds heading to Nusa Tenggara’s more accessible islands of Lombok and Sumbawa. Tucked in above Australia, this region has a narrow swell window with only its SW corner facing the Indian Ocean swells, so can suffer flat spells when the rest of Indo is working on a due S. But in typical Indo fashion, minor islands can hide major surf breaks and Rote, Savu and the surrounding outcrops are no exception, roaring to life in a straight SW swell.

Find more general info about when to go and statistics on the Low Pressure’s Stormrider Guide website

Sumba

East Nusa Tenggara (NTT) is, in many ways, different from the rest of Indonesia. NTT includes 566 islands, of which only 42 are inhabited, and the bulk of the population live on the three main islands of Timor, Flores and Sumba. It is geographically, ethnically and culturally a border area where the transition from Asia to Australia and Micronesia takes places. Deep offshore trenches and inter-island channels allow plenty of swell to hit the southwest-facing coast of Sumba, where waves of consequence get thrown onto the reefs of dead coral, volcanic rock and boulders. Sumba is not for everyone; the food and accommodation are basic and the mixed ethnic population speak 3 different languages. Huge megalithic tombs and thatched, peaked huts dot the landscape, while in the line-up, intrepid travellers are now sampling the oceanic power of this ancient island.
Sumba is a large zone that is only lightly covered, with dozens of scarily high quality waves interspersed between the major breaks on the map. Between Nihiwatu and Tarimbang a contorted playground of reefs, bays and rivermouths beckons the longer range boat charters, who are the only ones that are going to be able to access these waves that work in a range of different wind/swell combos, taking experienced captains quite a while to work out and extra diesel to keep commuting between safe anchorages and the empty line-ups.

Find more general info about when to go and statistics on the Low Pressure’s Stormrider Guide website.

 

Central Sumbawa

While many of the charter boats leaving Bali head east towards Nusa Tenggara, they usually only make it as far as the west coast of Sumbawa, so to get to the fabled waves of Teluk Cempi Bay in Central Sumbawa means a long, tedious journey by plane and taxi from Bali. Just south of Hu’u, Lakey (Lakai) Beach, is a long, wide, palm-lined stretch of ivory sand, fronted by reef. Since its discovery by Australian surfers in the mid ‘80s, Hu’u has been known to offer a varied selection of waves for every ability & taste. This area has produced some local stars like Dedi Gun, Joey Barrel and 2006 National Indonesian GromSearch winner, Oney Anwar. The total number of visiting surfers in the area can hit 150-200, especially when early morning high tides are happening, producing the best waves in glassy conditions. An extensive 500m wide lagoon needs to be negotiated to get out to the reef, and at low tide some more rock-hopping is required.

Find more general info about when to go and statistics on the Low Pressure’s Stormrider Guide website.


West Sumbawa

The next surf zone of West Sumbawa has been surfed for decades, but due to lack of good transport links, it has remained a boat itinerary for most. Scar, Supers and Yoyo’s are firm favourites, but cruise around the corner and a wave wilderness opens up along the south coast for 180km (110mi). Once again the charters are in a hurry to get to the name breaks and safe anchorages so few spots are regularly surfed. The predominant coastal angle would favour NW wet season winds, but there are many deep bays backed by high coastal ranges that funnel winds down valleys to meet the sea at rivermouths and reef passes that are going to work during the dry season. Remoteness, rough seas and no roads are going to keep this coast off the maps for years to come.

Lombok and Sumbawa fall into the middle ground of Nusa Tenggara province, confusingly named Nusa Tenggara Barat (translates as Southeastern Islands West). The climate is far drier, supporting a brown landscape of scrub and bush, clinging to lowland hills and a smattering of volcanoes. Sumbawa’s Mt Tambora ejected 4 times the magma of Krakatau, killing 72,000 and caused the “year of no summer” in 1816. These days the island remains sparsely populated, infrastructure is rudimentary with few good roads and the bustling tourist towns of Bali and beyond have yet to materialise here. Surfers have however, carved out a couple of epicentres alongside the two best west-facing surfing coasts. Across the Alas Strait from Lombok, a concentrated stretch of sharp, shallow reefs leave little to the imagination with names like Super Suck and Scar Reef, attracting thrill seekers who are usually on one of the many charters cruising between Bali and Rote.

Find more general info about when to go and statistics on the Low Pressure’s Stormrider Guide website.


Lombok

A mere stone’s throw away from Bali across the deeply cut channel is Lombok, a different, drier world that is like an exploded version of the Bukit Peninsula on Bali, just without the 5 star hotels. The real touristy feel is reserved for the Gili’s way up the north of the Lombok Strait, which feed off huge swells and NW winds, but there are further possibilities for surf along this west coast north of Sengigi and amongst the serene islands nestling behind Bangko Bangko. The south coast is cliffy and rocky, with lots of little islets and punctuated by a few really deep bays, which give Lombok way more flexibility in regards to swell size and beginners waves. It’s hard to suss the waves from the charter boats, who have their usual stops, but rarely find the time to explore, so there are some quiet corners along this coast for sure.
At its closest point, Lombok sits only 18km (11mi) east of Bali, yet major physical, cultural, linguistic and religious differences exist. The deep strait separating these islands links the Indian and Pacific oceans and is part of the “Wallace Line”, an established physical division between Asia and Australia. Bali is green with lush, tropical vegetation, while Lombok is drier, more rugged, with completely different flora and fauna. While the mountainous north rises to 3726m (12,224ft) at the top of Mount Rinjani, the south is a range of low inland hills spread behind the sweeping bays and pure white sands of the southern beaches. In terms of location, most surf breaks are truly breathtaking, but are generally regarded as of lower quality or intensity than Bali’s, with the notable exception of Desert Point, elected “Best Wave in the World” by Tracks magazine’s readers. More than any other island in Indo, Lombok is a year-round surfing destination. The peak season is obviously from April until early November, when classic 6-12ft (2-4m) longer period swells arrive from a SSW-WSW direction, which continue to arrive at 3-6ft (1-2m) during the wet season. More S suits Desert’s, the Gilis and the deep bays of Grupuk and Ekas, while more west will hit Mawi and exposed reefs nicely.

Find more general info about when to go and statistics on the Low Pressure’s Stormrider Guide website.

 

East Bali

Bali is “The island of 1000 temples” which the locals believe is blessed by the gods. The gods certainly have blessed the local surfers, because they live in a perfect, tropical surf paradise. Although 40 years of booming tourism development has drastically transformed the landscape and the line-ups, Bali remains an essential surfing experience. There is no denying the quality and quantity of its surf, when SW swells wrap consistent lines around the Bukit Peninsula into straight offshore winds, creating a list of world-class lefts, including Uluwatu, Padang Padang, Bingin and Kuta Reef. Add to these the quality beachbreaks of Kuta and Legian, plus the east side rights of Nusa Dua, Sanur and Keramas or Shipwrecks and Lacerations on Nusa Lembongan, then it becomes obvious that Bali has one of the highest concentration of quality waves on the planet. It’s geographical position mid-chain with the plunging depths of the Java Trench just offshore plus the island like symmetry of the Bukit peninsula poking into the regular SW swell train, offering offshore flexibility during the predictable trade wind seasons are just two of the defining factors that make Bali’s surf so good. There’s a huge variety of wave types from sublime, coral-floored caverns to supine, sand bottomed beachies that seem to bring the best out of surfers from complete beginners to budding pros. This microcosm of perfection has bred a couple of generations of supremely talented local surfers, who surf with a grace and ease that sits beautifully alongside the poise and unhurried approach to life that the general Balinese population exudes.

Find more general info about when to go and statistics on the Low Pressure’s Stormrider Guide website.


Bukit Peninsula

Bali is “The island of 1000 temples” which the locals believe is blessed by the gods. The gods certainly have blessed the local surfers, because they live in a perfect, tropical surf paradise. Although 40 years of booming tourism development has drastically transformed the landscape and the line-ups, Bali remains an essential surfing experience. There is no denying the quality and quantity of its surf, when SW swells wrap consistent lines around the Bukit Peninsula into straight offshore winds, creating a list of world-class lefts, including Uluwatu, Padang Padang, Bingin and Kuta Reef. Add to these the quality beachbreaks of Kuta and Legian, plus the east side rights of Nusa Dua, Sanur and Keramas or Shipwrecks and Lacerations on Nusa Lembongan, then it becomes obvious that Bali has one of the highest concentration of quality waves on the planet. It’s geographical position mid-chain with the plunging depths of the Java Trench just offshore plus the island like symmetry of the Bukit peninsula poking into the regular SW swell train, offering offshore flexibility during the predictable trade wind seasons are just two of the defining factors that make Bali’s surf so good. There’s a huge variety of wave types from sublime, coral-floored caverns to supine, sand bottomed beachies that seem to bring the best out of surfers from complete beginners to budding pros. This microcosm of perfection has bred a couple of generations of supremely talented local surfers, who surf with a grace and ease that sits beautifully alongside the poise and unhurried approach to life that the general Balinese population exudes.

Find more general info about when to go and statistics on the Low Pressure’s Stormrider Guide website.


West Bali

Bali is “The island of 1000 temples” which the locals believe is blessed by the gods. The gods certainly have blessed the local surfers, because they live in a perfect, tropical surf paradise. Although 40 years of booming tourism development has drastically transformed the landscape and the line-ups, Bali remains an essential surfing experience. There is no denying the quality and quantity of its surf, when SW swells wrap consistent lines around the Bukit Peninsula into straight offshore winds, creating a list of world-class lefts, including Uluwatu, Padang Padang, Bingin and Kuta Reef. Add to these the quality beachbreaks of Kuta and Legian, plus the east side rights of Nusa Dua, Sanur and Keramas or Shipwrecks and Lacerations on Nusa Lembongan, then it becomes obvious that Bali has one of the highest concentration of quality waves on the planet. It’s geographical position mid-chain with the plunging depths of the Java Trench just offshore plus the island like symmetry of the Bukit peninsula poking into the regular SW swell train, offering offshore flexibility during the predictable trade wind seasons are just two of the defining factors that make Bali’s surf so good. There’s a huge variety of wave types from sublime, coral-floored caverns to supine, sand bottomed beachies that seem to bring the best out of surfers from complete beginners to budding pros. This microcosm of perfection has bred a couple of generations of supremely talented local surfers, who surf with a grace and ease that sits beautifully alongside the poise and unhurried approach to life that the general Balinese population exudes.

Find more general info about when to go and statistics on the Low Pressure’s Stormrider Guide website.


G-Land

Steeped in legend since it was first spotted from a plane back in the early ‘70s, Grajagan or G-Land has rightly become one of the planet’s truly iconic waves. Peeling down the edge of a dense jungle that forms the Alas Purwo National Park at a place called Plengkung (co-incidentally lengkung translates as tube!), this perfect, magnificent, metric-mile reef, magically materializes some of the best lefts known to the surfing world. Geological serendipity must have been at play when forming the immense, coral-carpeted, lava platform reef that caps the SE tip of Java and all the right ingredients are present to create what can only be described as a freak of nature. Scarily deep water stalks the coast here, throwing lumps of swell at the point with the least resistance, after travelling the entire Indian Ocean unmolested. This means that G-Land will reliably be 2-3ft bigger than a similarly exposed Uluwatu on Bali, a mere 85km (53mi) across the Bali Strait and is probably the most consistent wave in Indo. The curve into Grajagan Bay is such that the omnipresent E-SE trades will billow nicely offshore from around 9.30am, everyday of the surf season, supporting the ruler-edged walls for those precious extra seconds that are often the difference between death and glory in G-Land’s extended maw. The final trump card is the reef angle that is near perfect, albeit in 4 sections, so that generally speaking, lifetime best tubes can be ridden by the hordes of surfers who invade this isolated wilderness every year. All arrivals for the G-Land surf camps hit the beach north of the point, allowing expectant newbies their first glimpse of the unfurling barrels from a side-on perspective. Not until you stand on the reef looking front-on does the scale of the wave become apparent.

A 20min walk north of camp arrives at 20/20’s where a break in the fringing reef allows some smaller, slower lefts to wrap into a sandy channel that also sports a swift, shallow right on the other side. Better off low tide when rips and urchins are worse but crowdless compared to G-Land. An hour-long walk from camp leads to Tiger Tracks Lefts, an assertive left that walls and occasionally tubes down an ill-defined reef. Also needs at least mid tide to clear the sharp coral and a bigger swell, preferably with W, to wrap into the bay. The pay-off is small numbers in the line-up. On the other side of the sandy bay is Tiger Tracks Rights, a super-fun, forgiving righthander that invites hard turns and the odd barrel, mainly for frustrated regular footers from G-Land camp, 20mins drive away. Filters the medium swells up to a little overhead, but the reef is exposed from mid tide down. Best 2hrs either side of high. There’s a shorter left off the peak and a few other peaks around, but crowds are rarely heavy and the few local kids are cool. Tanjung Kucur is a long jungle hike through to the protected Bali Strait side, so it needs a real pumping S swell to break. Long rights are the lure, but the chances of scoring before the SE wind hits are slim.

Find more general info about when to go and statistics on the Low Pressure’s Stormrider Guide website.


East Java

This 600km south-facing stretch of Javanese shores represents the lightest surfed coastline in Indo’s southern hemisphere wave zone. The reasons why this stretch is unappealing include a year-round, side to onshore wind exposure, an unhelpful geology of plunging volcanic cliffs, islets and skerries, separated by long, current scoured, black sand beaches. Dangerous, thumping close-outs drum the sand in the swell season, but the potential for smaller, peaky, SE-SW swells to create piping beachbreaks in the shoulder and off season is always there. Luck plays a big part in identifying where rideable sandbars may be and finding other surfers to tackle lonely breaks is rare. Yogyakarta surfers are close to unruly Parangtritis Beach, but will head east to Pacitan where the deep protection of Teleng Ria Beach offers a sliding scale size of beachbreak plus a cultured left rivermouth that’s protected from the trades. The crazed coastline of pocket bays and ragged rocky islets continues east, and there are some potential set-ups for both trade wind directions or glassy conditions. Sudimoro has an E-wind-protected left reef, but construction of a power plant and jetty has brought pollution. Round the corner the Banjar rivermouth and beachbreak has similar exposure and water quality problems. More scalloped bays of volcanic sand face into the SW swell and some have defined lefthanders in the eastern corners, nestling out of the sideshore winds. Tambakrejo has rights and lefts over a dead coral shelf, but needs N quadrant winds. The limestone reef at Balekambang is fairly straight and exposed, but it’s a popular tourist spot to see the island temple a la Tanah Lot. The islands of Sempu and Barung are way too cliffy and the big bay of beachbreaks between them can have some heavy barrels, but it’s usually unappealing and windblown. This trend of cliff and close-out continues right through the mountainous Meru Betiri National Park and on to the serendipitous curve of Grajagan Bay and the majestic lefts of G-Land.

Find more general info about when to go and statistics on the Low Pressure’s Stormrider Guide website.


West Java
Close to the sprawling cities of Jakarta and Bandung, West Java is the most densely populated region in Indonesia with around 42m inhabitants. Once part of the old Sunda Kingdom, it is now split into Banteng and West Java provinces. Despite the huge population, this SW tip of Java is a wild, unspoilt land in places, with large National Parks and World Heritage sites preserving the largest area of lowland rainforest in Java. When Krakatoa exploded in 1883 and covered the region in a thick layer of volcanic ash, humans left the land to indigenous species like the incredibly rare Javan rhinoceros, leopard and many types of primate. West Java is no different from many other Indonesian surf regions, being blessed with a handful of world-class breaks, plus plenty of other lesser waves you would love to have in your town. One of the countries most daunting yet rewarding barrels pinwheels down the coral crusted lava of Panaitan Island, which forms a part of the Ujong Kulon National Park. One Palm Point is legendary for long barrels, with unsubstantiated reports of timing a wave that barrelled for 48secs, albeit without a rider. This island tube-fest is nicely complemented by a mainland left that challenges for Indonesia’s heavyweight, big wave crown. Ombak Tujuh translates as Seven Waves, which may give a hint of board length required to handle this jacking, powerful beast when a big swell hits. In between there are more reefs, beachbreaks and rivermouths with something to suit everyone’s style and ability.

Find more general info about when to go and statistics on the Low Pressure’s Stormrider Guide website.


Lampung

The offshore islands of Nias and the Mentawais have been under the surf media spotlight for years, while Sumatra's mainland has remained off the radar of most travelling surfers. Despite an ideal orientation to Indian Ocean swell hitting the contoured coastline of the fifth biggest island in the world, Sumatra remains a quiet surfing backwater off the beaten Indonesian track. Sumatra has a reputation for being wild, riddled with malaria and the west coast of Lampung lies uncomfortably close to Krakatau, responsible for the most violent volcanic eruption ever recorded (1883) accompanied by 120ft (40m) high waves. Today the area remains scarcely populated and is rarely visited by tourists, despite the Bali bombing highlighting the fact that remote areas may be safer than tourist hotspots. The fishing town of Krui, is the centre of the region's coastal districts, being the first village accessed from the interior road network and providing the most services for locals and travellers alike.

Find more general info about when to go and statistics on the Low Pressure’s Stormrider Guide website.


Northern Mentawaii Islands

In a very short period of time, this wild and remote chain of islands, lying about 90k’s (55mi) off the Sumatran mainland, have become the most sought after destination for surfers looking to ride “the best waves in the world”. This bold claim is rarely disputed, as those who score a solid SW swell will testify and few return from the Mentawais disappointed with the wave quality and quantity. The key to this rapid ascension to the pinnacle of world surfing lies in the sheer concentration of truly world-class breaks and an unmatched flexibility when it comes to handling different swell and wind combinations. Being a degree or three below the equator helps massively, as the light, flukey winds provide a variety of directions unseen in other parts of Indonesia and it often transpires that proper glassy conditions bookend the day. Furthermore, the geomorphology of this seismically active region seems to cause unusual swell refraction and diffraction, creating unexpected waves round the back of islands and islets where none should normally exist. These coral encrusted lava reefs fringe a still relatively untouched rainforest and many of the tribal inhabitants of the remoter regions still cling to a traditional subsistence lifestyle, maintaining little contact with the outside world. Progress is unavoidable though and whereas 15 years ago, yacht charters were the only way to go, now a half dozen land camps have been established at the banner waves and many more are planned. This has led to Silabu Village installing 2 buoys in Pasongan harbour next to Macaronis, requiring boats to book in a week before arrival and pay a $30 mooring fee plus the $1.50 per head surfer fee, which are used for community projects. This limits the numbers to around 36 maximum, shared evenly between the resort and charters and stops anchor damage in the bay. This precedent may expand across the region if resorts can obtain the various government licenses. Threats to revoke charter licenses for boats not registered in Indonesia have been rumoured and would drastically reduce surf fleet numbers if implemented.
The hulking mass of Siberut presents a primal vista, with the hardwood forest shrouded in mist and it exudes an air of power and mystery, emanating from the mountainous interior. This largest island in the Mentawai chain has only been lightly surfed by long-range charter crews grabbing an opportunistic wave on the way to the Nias area. That means spots on the backside are more often seen from the northern tip at Tanjung Sigep, down to the impossibly sheltered Teluk Tabekat and out to the headland at Sikabaluan, but most will pass by like ships in the night. A good deal of the SW-facing coast is straight line reefs, exposed and messed up by wind and swell, but a few obvious jinks in the coast could produce a left or two at Tanjungs Sakaladat, Sataerataera and Simasuket. Many captains will have a few spots sussed for certain conditions and there are some mellow breaks in the playgrounds area that get ridden like Taileleo, a fun mal slide facing south, Pearlers peak nestled behind Masokut and a righthander round the backside near the Muara harbour. It is important to recognise that while there are 40-60 named breaks, many more are out there, being surfed by experienced captains who know the deal.

Find more general info about when to go and statistics on the Low Pressure’s Stormrider Guide website.


Batu Islands/ Telo Islands

Often referred to as the Telos, the 51 Batu Islands have dodged the bulk of the Nias and Mentawai crowds for much the same reason as the Banyaks. There are fewer big name spots and the best set-ups often require stronger swells, usually from the rarer W direction. However, consistent, year-round, headhigh surf can always be found with plenty of fun, easier line-ups that cater to most tastes and abilities. A few surf camps have opened, but for independent travellers, this place is a mission without a boat to get around and it has a reputation for malaria and other diseases. There are flights from Medan and Padang to the small strip at Lasondre on Tanahmasa, plus ferries from Nias, but most of the waves are found on the smaller islands to the NW. Check around and in between the larger islands of Telo, Sipika and the more exposed reefs of Pulau Sigata. Like the Mentawais, refraction brings swell in at unusual angles so don’t discount either end of Pulau Pini during big pulses. Down south on Tanahbala, there are some less frequented breaks with longer travelling times between them especially if going all the way to Bojo. The camps all have their own names for the spots, so it depends on who you travel with, but there is no doubt this group holds some excellent waves and since the equator runs through here, winds are rarely a problem with plenty of glass and a spot for all wind/swell combos.

Find more general info about when to go and statistics on the Low Pressure’s Stormrider Guide website.


Nias and Hinako Islands

The perfect righthander at Lagundri Bay on the island of Nias was the first world-class wave discovered in the Sumatra region. Nias was first surfed in 1975, by Aussie surf pioneers Peter Troy, Kevin Lovett and John Giesel. They put up with swarms of malarial mosquitoes and the most primitive of living conditions to ride absolute perfection in the jungle. These days, it’s much easier to get to Nias Island and a slew of losmens fringe the deep bay, competing to accommodate the constant stream of surfers. The massive 2005 earthquake tipped the island, lifting reefs in the south with some waves improving and others disappearing. Just offshore in the Hinako Islands, the two super-consistent, crowd-spreading spots have also been affected; Bawa’s bowly rights have suffered while Asu’s lengthy lefts have got even hollower over the lifted reefs.

Find more general info about when to go and statistics on the Low Pressure’s Stormrider Guide website.


Simulue and Banyak islands

Simeulue and Banyak still maintain a frontier status, avoiding the charter boat congestion of the Ments through a combination of lower consistency and spot density, treating smaller groups to some lively waves, including one of Indo’s best rights. The offshore islands of Sumatra are no secret to surfers; the Mentawais attract ever-increasing crowds to it’s feast of barrels and Nias has continued to draw surf adventurers to Lagundri for the last 35 years, but head further north and the path is far less traveled. The remote island of Simeulue is located 120km (75mi) from the Sumatran west coast, where the surprisingly busy town of Sinabang thrives on trading cloves. To the east, and closer to the mainland by 50kms, the Banyak Island group is in the South Aceh Regency, supporting small populations on seven of the bigger islands, while the majority of the others remain uninhabited. Not surprisingly, these “Many” islands have kept off the radar as Aceh’s civil unrest made getting permits difficult until recently. Many spots remain nameless, or have multiple names from the different boat operators that ply these waters, but there’s a wide choice of lefts and rights, ranging from shallow barrels to deeper, long, cruisey waves as well as some good off-season beachbreaks.

Find more general info about when to go and statistics on the Low Pressure’s Stormrider Guide website.


Condition descriptions provided by the operator

Indonesia and especially Bali is known as one of the best surf destinations in the world. Groundswells, coming far from the southern ocean, ensure consistent conditions the whole year round. 17.500 islands, hundred miles of coastline, uncountable surf spots from beach break, point break or reef break to secret spot, slow and long, short and fast, hollow and powerful, left and right waves – welcome to Surfer’s paradise. Blessed with two coastlines, Bali offers perfect conditions for all surf levels.Average swell size (wave height) in feet throughout the year.
 
 JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSeptOctNovDec
8 +            
6 - 7 ft            
5 - 6 ft            
4 - 5 ft            
 
The months from October to May are characterized by smaller swells, offering perfect conditions for surf beginners. From May to October the bigger, more powerful swells are best suited for advanced Surfers. Please note that the crowd factor can be high during that period.We recommend:
  • General recommendations for SAMA SAMA Guided Surf Boat Trips
  • December to March: Best time for trips to the Pacific Ocean (Northern Maluku)
  • February to May and October to November: Best time for trips to the East and West of Bali (less people, friendly medium-sized waves for all surf levels, especially beginners)
  • June to September: Best time for advanced Surfers (consistently powerful waves)Bali is also Surfers' shopping paradise. Explore the countless surf shops which offer surf boards, board shorts, rash shirts, booties, wax or leashes of any brand for an affordable price.
PP/Night from US$ 205