The Slow Canggu

Indonesia: Bali

In the heart of it all is The Slow Canggu. The surfer town's most modern and arty surf resort with plenty of breaks nearby for all types of surfers.

West Bali

Like the rest of the south-facing islands in the archipelago, Bali benefits from an almost endless supply of Southern Ocean groundswell arriving form the S to WSW (180º-247º) but by far the most consistent direction is due SW (225º). These swells range from 3-12ft (1-4m), with averages around 5ft @ 11secs from Nov-March, then upping to 7-8ft @ 14secs in the middle of the April to Oct high season. Underlying windswell can mix in from the SE to the W but has little bearing on the surf at most breaks. Sometimes, 6-10ft (2-3m) tropical cyclone swells can arrive from far off disturbances in the western Indian Ocean off the coast of Madagascar and occasionally from storms a lot closer, forming around the Keeling Islands and NW Australia through the southern hemisphere summer. The big Bay of Bengal typhoons are too far north for Bali. Swells are focused onto the Bukit Peninsula because of the deep-water channels on either side of Bali, particularly the east side Lombok channel, which can draw in overhead waves to Nusa Dua when everywhere else seems too small. The ESE trade winds blow reliably from April to Oct, giving west Bukit breaks a 50% chance of being a 5 star day throughout June, July and August. Transition months can have oscillating winds with a bit of everything – Nov blows mainly from the SE to SW. Winds then shift SW-NW for the Dec to March wet-season, with either side of W dominant and a higher percentage of SW than NW, which is not ideal for many east coast spots like Nusa Dua, Serangan and Keramas. March is more W-SW with 1 day in 5 swinging back to ESE offering the chance of empty Ulu’s for the switched on. Wet season wind speeds are on the whole lower, usually staying below 10mph (16kph) compared to the dry season SE trades which regularly hit double that. Tide charts are posted in surf shop windows. There is a big and a small tide each day (semi-diurnal odd) and some spots only work at certain stages of tide especially if it is small. Full and new moons often see a jump in swell size as tidal range increases and these spring high tides occur around the same time of day throughout the year. Charts are widely available in surf shops and on the internet.

Find more general info about when to go and statistics on the Low Pressure’s Stormrider Guide website.

Bukit Peninsula

Like the rest of the south-facing islands in the archipelago, Bali benefits from an almost endless supply of Southern Ocean groundswell arriving form the S to WSW (180º-247º) but by far the most consistent direction is due SW (225º). These swells range from 3-12ft (1-4m), with averages around 5ft @ 11secs from Nov-March, then upping to 7-8ft @ 14secs in the middle of the April to Oct high season. Underlying windswell can mix in from the SE to the W but has little bearing on the surf at most breaks. Sometimes, 6-10ft (2-3m) tropical cyclone swells can arrive from far off disturbances in the western Indian Ocean off the coast of Madagascar and occasionally from storms a lot closer, forming around the Keeling Islands and NW Australia through the southern hemisphere summer. The big Bay of Bengal typhoons are too far north for Bali. Swells are focused onto the Bukit Peninsula because of the deep-water channels on either side of Bali, particularly the east side Lombok channel, which can draw in overhead waves to Nusa Dua when everywhere else seems too small. The ESE trade winds blow reliably from April to Oct, giving west Bukit breaks a 50% chance of being a 5 star day throughout June, July and August. Transition months can have oscillating winds with a bit of everything – Nov blows mainly from the SE to SW. Winds then shift SW-NW for the Dec to March wet-season, with either side of W dominant and a higher percentage of SW than NW, which is not ideal for many east coast spots like Nusa Dua, Serangan and Keramas. March is more W-SW with 1 day in 5 swinging back to ESE offering the chance of empty Ulu’s for the switched on. Wet season wind speeds are on the whole lower, usually staying below 10mph (16kph) compared to the dry season SE trades which regularly hit double that. Tide charts are posted in surf shop windows. There is a big and a small tide each day (semi-diurnal odd) and some spots only work at certain stages of tide especially if it is small. Full and new moons often see a jump in swell size as tidal range increases and these spring high tides occur around the same time of day throughout the year. Charts are widely available in surf shops and on the internet.

Find more general info about when to go and statistics on the Low Pressure’s Stormrider Guide website.

East Bali

Like the rest of the south-facing islands in the archipelago, Bali benefits from an almost endless supply of Southern Ocean groundswell arriving form the S to WSW (180º-247º) but by far the most consistent direction is due SW (225º). These swells range from 3-12ft (1-4m), with averages around 5ft @ 11secs from Nov-March, then upping to 7-8ft @ 14secs in the middle of the April to Oct high season. Underlying windswell can mix in from the SE to the W but has little bearing on the surf at most breaks. Sometimes, 6-10ft (2-3m) tropical cyclone swells can arrive from far off disturbances in the western Indian Ocean off the coast of Madagascar and occasionally from storms a lot closer, forming around the Keeling Islands and NW Australia through the southern hemisphere summer. The big Bay of Bengal typhoons are too far north for Bali. Swells are focused onto the Bukit Peninsula because of the deep-water channels on either side of Bali, particularly the east side Lombok channel, which can draw in overhead waves to Nusa Dua when everywhere else seems too small. The ESE trade winds blow reliably from April to Oct, giving west Bukit breaks a 50% chance of being a 5 star day throughout June, July and August. Transition months can have oscillating winds with a bit of everything – Nov blows mainly from the SE to SW. Winds then shift SW-NW for the Dec to March wet-season, with either side of W dominant and a higher percentage of SW than NW, which is not ideal for many east coast spots like Nusa Dua, Serangan and Keramas. March is more W-SW with 1 day in 5 swinging back to ESE offering the chance of empty Ulu’s for the switched on. Wet season wind speeds are on the whole lower, usually staying below 10mph (16kph) compared to the dry season SE trades which regularly hit double that. Tide charts are posted in surf shop windows. There is a big and a small tide each day (semi-diurnal odd) and some spots only work at certain stages of tide especially if it is small. Full and new moons often see a jump in swell size as tidal range increases and these spring high tides occur around the same time of day throughout the year. Charts are widely available in surf shops and on the internet.

Find more general info about when to go and statistics on the Low Pressure’s Stormrider Guide website.

PP/Night from US$ 133